The scaffold protein, Homer1b/c, regulates axon pathfinding in the central nervous system in vivo.

TitleThe scaffold protein, Homer1b/c, regulates axon pathfinding in the central nervous system in vivo.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2001
AuthorsFoa L, Rajan I, Haas K, Wu GY, Brakeman P, Worley P, Cline H
JournalNat Neurosci
Volume4
Issue5
Pagination499-506
Date Published2001 May
ISSN1097-6256
KeywordsAnimals, Axons, Blotting, Western, Carrier Proteins, Central Nervous System, Electroporation, Heterozygote, Homer Scaffolding Proteins, Image Processing, Computer-Assisted, Immunohistochemistry, Ligands, Neuropeptides, Oocytes, Organ Culture Techniques, Rats, Signal Transduction, Superior Colliculi, Vaccinia virus, Xenopus
Abstract

Homer proteins are a family of multidomain cytosolic proteins that have been postulated to serve as scaffold proteins that affect responses to extracellular signals by regulating protein-protein interactions. We tested whether Homer proteins are involved in axon pathfinding in vivo, by expressing both wild-type and mutant isoforms of Homer in Xenopus optic tectal neurons. Time-lapse imaging demonstrated that interfering with the ability of endogenous Homer to form protein-protein interactions resulted in axon pathfinding errors at stereotypical choice points. These data demonstrate a function for scaffold proteins such as Homer in axon guidance. Homer may facilitate signal transduction from cell-surface receptors to intracellular proteins that govern the establishment of axon trajectories.

URLhttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11319558
DOI10.1038/87447
Alternate JournalNat. Neurosci.
PubMed ID11319558